Harry Potter in Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese Translation & Mongolian
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Chapter 17: The Man with Two Faces

 

Chinese (Mainland)
双面人
Shuāngmiàn-rén
shuāng = 'double'.
miàn = 'face'.
rén = 'person'.
Double-faced Person
Chinese (Taiwan)
雙面人
Shuāngmiàn-rén
shuāng = 'double'.
miàn = 'face'.
rén = 'person'.
Double-faced Person
Japanese
二つの顔をもつ男
Futatsu no kao o motsu otoko
二つ futatsu = 'two'.
no = connecting particle
顔を kao o = 'face' + object particle
もつ motsu = 'to have', present tense.
otoko = 'man'.
The Man who has Two Faces
Vietnamese (Chinese characters show etymology)
Người hai mặt người = 'person'.
hai = 'two'.
mặt = 'face'.
Person with Two Faces
Mongolian (previous)
Хоёр нүүртэн
Khoyor nüürten
хоёр khoyor = 'two'.
нүүр nüür = 'face'.
-тэн -ten = 'people having'.
(Added to хоёр нүүр khoyor nüür to describe class of people having the quality mentioned.)
One having Two Faces
Mongolian (new)
Хоёр нүүртэй хүн
Khoyor nüürtei khün
хоёр khoyor = 'two'.
нүүр nüür = 'face' + тэй tei 'having'.
хүн khün = 'person'.
Person with Two Faces

Literally a man with two faces, one at the front and one at the back. (Incidentally, The Man with Two Faces is also the title of several classic movies).

    The Chinese in both versions uses the neat compound word: 雙面人 / 双面人 shuāngmiàn-rén ( / shuāng 'double, dual', miàn 'face, aspect', rén 'person'). This does not spell out the sex of the person.

    Vietnamese also uses a brief compound expression, người hai mặt 'two face person'. In Vietnamese, 'person' (người) comes first followed by 'two faces' (hai mặt).

    The Mongolian translations use the grammatical and derivational resources of the language to create appropriate expressions. The newer Mongolian translation uses the case form -тэй -tei 'having, with'. -тэй -tei follows vowel harmony to agree with нүүр nüür 'face', which has a feminine vowel. The use of хүн khün 'person' does not spell out the sex of the man with two faces.

    The older translation uses -t 'having' + -эн -en, a suffix for people with that attribute. The meaning is thus 'one (of those) having two faces'. -t is a short form of -тэй -tei (above). -эн -en follows vowel harmony to agree with нүүр nüür 'face', which has a feminine vowel.

    The Japanese uses the clause 二つの顔をもつ futatsu no kao o motsu 'to have two faces' to modify the noun otoko 'man'. (Here the word for 'two' is 二つ futatsu, which happens not to need a counter or classifier - see word order notes.) The Japanese spells out the sex of the person.

    (A summary of this chapter can be found at Harry Potter Facts. Detailed notes on the chapter can be found at Harry Potter Lexicon)

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    Book 2