Bathrobe's Harry Potter in Chinese, Japanese & Vietnamese Translation
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Names of Critters and Pets in the Japanese and Vietnamese Translations of Harry Potter

 

(For the romanisation of Japanese, see Transliteration. To understand the writing systems of CJV, see Writing Systems.)

 

Note: Vietnamese transliterations are taken from footnotes, not from the main text.

 

MAGICAL CRITTERS
English
Japanese
Vietnamese
Notes
Norbert ノーバート
Nōbāto
Norbert
(Nô-be)
Nōbāto features a long stretched-out 'bert' that doesn't occur in the English but is normal in Japanese transliteration.
Fluffy フラッフィー
Furaffii
Fluffy
(Phơ-lớp-phi)
Interesting parallels between the Vietnamese (pronunciation) and Japanese, in particular the 'Fu - laf - fi' syllable structure.
Buckbeak バックビーク
Bakkubiiku
Buckbeak
(Bấc-bích)
 
Fawkes フォークス
Fōkusu
Fawkes
(Phóc)
 
Aragog アラゴグ
Aragogu
Aragog
(A-ra-gốc)
 
Nagini ナギニ
Nagini
Nagini No phonetic transliteration is given for Nagini in the Vietnamese translation.

 

PETS
English
Japanese
Taiwan
Notes
Mrs Norris ミセス・ノリス
Misesu Norisu
bà Norris
(bà Nô-rít)
The Japanese version follows the English completely, including the word 'Mrs' (ミセス Misesu). The final 's' in 'Norris' is converted into 't' in the glossed pronunciation (Vietnamese).
Hedwig ヘドウィグ
Hedowigu
Hedwig
(Hết-quịt)
 
Pigwidgeon (Pig) ピッグウィジョン (ピッグ)
Piggu-wijon (Piggu)
Pigwidgeon
(Píc-guýt-giần)
or
Heo-Vịt-trời (Heo)
Japanese quite faithfully transliterates the English into katakana. The short 'i' in 'pig' is rendered in Japanese by doubling the following consonant (piggu).

The Vietnamese translator at some places uses the name 'Pigwidgeon', as in English, pronounced Píc-guýt-giần according to the footnote. In other places she uses Heo-Vịt-trời, meaning quite literally 'pig wigeon'. Heo is the southern dialect word for 'pig' in Vietnamese. The word Vịt-trời literally means 'sky-duck', and is an attempt to translate the English word 'wigeon/widgeon', a kind of duck. This is an valiant attempt at making sense of the name.
Errol エロール
Erōru
Errol
(Ê-ron)
The drawn-out 'rooohl' in Japanese エロール Erōru is somewhat curious. The Vietnamese pronunciation ends in 'n' because Vietnamese words cannot end in 'l'.
Hermes ヘルメス
Herumesu
Hermes
(Hẹc-mét)
In Japanese, Hermes' name is the same as that of the Greek god Hermes, showing the 'r' sound. If it were based on the the English pronunciation of 'Hermes', it would be written ハーミーズ Hāmiizu. The French fashion brand 'Hermès' is known in Japanese as エルメス Erumesu, leaving out the initial 'h' in accordance with French pronunciation.

The Vietnamese pronunciation of 'Hermes', shown in a footnote, follows the convention of using 'c' to represent 'r', based on the guttural French 'r' sound. The final 's' is changed to 't' because Vietnamese words cannot end in 's'. Note that 'h' should be pronounced, unlike the French.
Crookshanks クルックシャンクス
Kurukkushankusu
Crookshanks
(Cờ-rúc-sanh)
Linguistically, 'Crookshanks' in Japanese looks bizarre. The name 'Crookshanks' has two syllables in English. It has eight in Japanese, according to the Japanese method of reckoning! The Vietnamese pronunciation (according to the footnote) has only three, although this brevity is achieved at the cost of dropping the final 'ks'.
Scabbers スキャバーズ
Skyabāzu
Scabbers
(Xcap-bờ)

Note the kya in Japanese Skyabāzu. The idea is that this represents the (so-called) short 'a' sound in English.

The Vietnamese translator gives an explanation for the name 'Scabbers': tí vảy ghẻ ('scabby rat').

Trevor トレバー
Torebā
Trevor
(Tre-vo)
The 'tr' in Vietnamese is pronounced 'ch' or similar to the English 'tr' sound. Japanese separates the two sounds into トレ 'to-re'
Fang ファング
Fangu
Fang
(Phang)
Unlike the Chinese translations, the Japanese and Vietnamese versions use a transliteration of the sound, not a translation of the meaning.

 

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