Bathrobe's Harry Potter in Chinese, Japanese & Vietnamese Translation
unicode encoded

Home > Magical Books >

 

 

The Titles of Magical Books in Harry Potter

 

Flesh-Eating Trees of the World

 

Chinese (Mainland) 食肉树大全
Shíròu-shù dàquán
食肉 shíròu = 'meat-eating'.
shù= 'tree'.
大全 dàquán = 'complete work, complete collection'.
Complete collection of meat-eating trees
Chinese (Taiwan) 世界食肉樹大全
Shìjiè shíròu-shù dàquán
世界 shìjiè = 'world'.
食肉 shíròu = 'meat-eating'.
shù= 'tree'.
大全 dàquán = 'complete work, complete collection'.
Complete collection of world meat-eating trees
Japanese 世界の肉食植物
Sekai no shokuniku shokubutsu
世界 sekai = 'world'.
no = connecting particle
肉食 shokuniku = 'meat-eating'.
植物 shokubutsu = 'plant'.
World's meat-eating plants
Vietnamese Cây Ăn Thịt Trên Thế Giới cây = 'tree'.
ăn thịt = 'eat meat'.
trên = 'on, in'.
thế giới (世界) = 'world'.
Meat-eating trees of the world

There are just a few points of difference among the translations:

The word 'flesh-eating' is of some interest. Rowling could have used 'meat-eating' or 'carnivorous', but chose 'flesh-eating' instead, presumably because of the immediacy of the English word 'flesh-eating' over the Latin-based 'carnivorous', and because 'flesh-eating' is used of animals whereas 'meat-eating' can be used of people. Flesh is always raw whereas meat can be cooked.

Chinese and Japanese both have two words for 'carnivorous': 食肉 (shíròu or shokuniku) and 肉食 (ròushí or nikushoku), representing 'eat + meat' and 'meat + eat' respectively. The variation in order doesn't affect the meaning. However, the translators' choices appear to mirror the current preferred order of each language. For 'carnivore', Vietnamese normally uses the instantly understandable native expression ăn thịt, meaning 'eat meat', which is used in this translation.

Category: Magical Plants

arrow up
JavaScript Menu By Milonic