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Quand on l'a tiré à la carabine as translated in 'The Little Prince'
Japanese versions

 

Je sentais battre son cœur comme celui d'un oiseau qui meurt, quand on l'a tiré à la carabine. The last part of this sentence, quand on l'a tiré à la carabine, literally means 'when one has shot it with a carbine'. In English, it is variously translated as 'shot with someone's rifle', 'brought down by a rifle shot', and 'that's been shot'.

There is only one sentence structure found in the Japanese translations of this phrase (this includes a couple of translations that use 撃たれた utareta 'was shot', which I treat simply as a variation of 撃たれて utarete 'to be shot'):

Instrument Passive verb
銃で
jū de
'with a gun'
撃たれて
utarete
'shot (passive)'

There is, however, quite a lot of variety in vocabulary, especially in words for 'gun'.

'gun' 'with' 'shot (passive)'


'gun'
4

de
'with
15
うたれて / 撃たれて / 打たれて
utarete
'shot'
14
鉄砲
teppō
'rifle'
4
    うちおとされて
uchi-otosarete
'shot down'
1
空気銃
kūki-jū
'air gun'
2
       
カービン銃
kābin-jū
'carbine'
2
       
猟銃
ryōjū
'hunting gun'
2
       
ライフル
raifuru
'rifle'
1
       
Total
15
Total
15
Total 15

Japanese translators manage to come up with five different types of weapon! I will again turn to Wikipedia to look at the differences:

French Carabine militaire Carabine de chasse
English Carbine Rifle
Japanese カービン kābin 'carbine' 小銃 shōjū 'small gun'
Also:
ライフル銃 raifuru-jū 'rifle gun '

Again, the カービン kābin is described as shorter than the 小銃 shōjū and was originally for cavalry use. Since it is a military weapon, not a hunting weapon, the two translators who use カービン銃 kābin-jū appear to have been misled by the form of the French word.

猟銃 ryōjū is, as the name suggests, a hunting rifle. In Japan, only three kinds of gun are allowed in hunting: 散弾銃 sandan-jū 'shotgun', ライフル銃 raifuru-jū 'rifle', and 空気銃 kūki-jū 'air rifle'. Thus, translators who use 猟銃 ryōjū, ライフル銃 raifuru-jū, and 空気銃 kūki-jū are all on the mark as far as capturing the fact that it is a hunting weapon that has brought down the dying bird.

Of the other words used, and 鉄砲 teppō are both general everyday words for guns, the latter particularly referring to long-barrelled guns, and are quite acceptable as translations of carabine.

Below is a list of translations of the clause quand on l'a tiré à la carabine.

0 Original quand on l'a tiré à la carabine  
English    
1 Woods 1943 shot with someone's rifle  
2 Cuffe 1995 brought down by a rifle shot  
3 Testot-Ferry 1995 shot with someone's rifle  
4 Howard 2000 that's been shot  
Japanese    
1 Naitō 1953 鉄砲でうたれて F
2 Fujita 2005 ライフルでうちおとされ F
3 Ikezawa 2005 銃で撃たれて F
4 Ishii 2005 銃で撃たれて F
5 Kawakami & Tsuzura 2005 銃に撃たれて F
6 Mino 2005 空気銃で打たれた F
7 Yamazaki 2005 猟銃で撃たれて F
8 Inagaki 2006 空気銃で撃たれて F
9 Kawahara 2006 鉄砲で撃たれて F
10 Kojima 2006 カービン銃で撃たれて F
11 Kōno 2006 猟銃で撃たれて F
12 Kurahashi 2006 鉄砲で撃たれて F
13 Mita 2006 鉄砲でうたれた F
14 Nozaki 2006 銃で撃たれて F
15 Tanigawa 2006 カービン銃で撃たれて F
Adaptations    
7 Shinsan 2005 ハンターに撃たれて F

 

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